Color Genetics:

 

There are 144 color variations of a lionhead rabbit and this can be broken down in basic genetics.

 

There are 5 sets of colors which determine the color of the rabbit and each of these groups include sets of genes, presented as followed:

 

AA, BB, CC, DD, EE (Dominant)

aa, bb, cc, dd, ee (Recessive)

Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd, Ee (Dominant-recessive carriers)

 

Broken groups:

EnEn - Charly

Enen - Broken

enen - Solid coloured rabbit


Dominant vs. Recessive

 

The rabbit receives one gene of each parent, therefore this produces the sets of genes and the first letter in each gene set conveys the dominant gene, and the second letter represents the carried gene. Genes are always presented as dominant and recessive. 

A dominant gene is the trait one can see or observe and these genes also make up the rabbits phenotype (observable traits). The recessive traits are traits an observer can not see, yet they are in the genetic code of the rabbit and therefore carried through its genes. All the recessive and dominant genes make up the lionheads genotype

A dominant gene will hide the recessive gene and the recessive gene can only be observed if there are two recessive copies. 

The different combinations of dominant and recessive genes can be viewed as followed:

The image above shows dominant to dominant breeding. All offspring will have the dominant genes appearance and will only carry the dominant gene. The offspring is AA and therefore 100% dominant.

The image above shows dominant- recessive carrier to dominant-recessive c breeding. This will produce: 25% AA (dominant appearance-dominant carriers), 25% aa (recessive appearance-recessive carriers), 50% Aa (dominant appearance-recessive carriers).

The image above shows dominant- recessive carrier to recessive breeding. This will produce: 50% Aa (dominant appearance-recessive carriers), 50% aa (recessive appearance-recessive carriers).

The image above shows recessive to recessive breeding. This will produce: 100% aa (recessive in appearance and as carriers).


Agouti vs. Self- "A" The Agouti Gene

 

 

Agouti:

The rabbits coat colour in its natural form is called Agouti and through genetic mutation the gene restricts some of the natural occuring colour in Agouti. Therefore a seemingly new colour will be ensued. 

Agouti characteristics focus on the wild color with lighter coloring around the eyes; nose and mouth; and white coloring underneath the rabbits belly and tail. The individual hairs have color bands.

Agouti is the dominant gene (A). 

 

http://www.gbfarm.org/rabbit/holland-colors-tan.shtml

The image above shows and Agouti colored litter

 

 

Self:

Self on the other hand, is a uniform color and does not show any lighter markings on the facial area or belly.

Self is the recessive gene and can be found in the genotype as "a" or "at". In the "at" gene the same tan pattern as in the A gene is displayed, but the individual have no color bands. The "a" gene can only be viewed as "aa" and displayes a uniform color. 

http://www.satinangora.de/gen-farben.html

The image above shows a rabbit with the Self gene

 
 

Self and Agouti determined in the genotype:

AA - The rabbits appearance is Agouti and it carries the Agouti gene

Aa - The rabbits appearance is Agouti but it carries both the Agouti and the Self gene

aa - The rabbits appearance is Self and it carries the Self gene

 

Black vs. Chocolate- "B" The Black/Brown Gene

 

 

Black: 

The rabbits fur is black or black based.

Black is the dominant gene (B).

The image above shows a Black colored rabbit

 
 

Chocolate: 

The rabbits fur is chocolate or chocolate based.

Chocolate is the recessive gene (b).

The image above shows a Chocolate colored rabbit

 

The image above shows a Chocolate colored rabbit with the Löffelohr Gene

 
 

Black and Chocolate determined in the genotype:

BB - The rabbits appearance is Black and it carries only the Black gene

Bb - The rabbits appearance is Black but it carries both the Black and the Chocolate gene

bb - The rabbits appearance is Chocolate and it carries only the Chocolate gene

 

Colored vs. Ruby-Eyed White (REW Gene)- "C" The Color Saturation Gene

 

 

Fully Colored: 

Pigments are present in the rabbits fur, nails and/or eyes. Therefore the rabbit shows full color.
 
Colored is the dominant gene (C).
 

The image above shows a Colored rabbit with all pigments present

 
 

The Chinchilla Dark Gene:

This gene is known as the Chinchilla Dark Gene and will allow the production of some of the color pigments in the rabbit. If the rabbit has the Agouti gene, white bands will appear between the dark color bands. In general, the yellow pigment is reduced to white. Furthermore, the chinchilla gene can come in combination with blue-eyed rabbits.

Furthermore, the cchd gene is co-dominant to its alternating cchl gene. 

This gene is represented as "cchd"

The image above shows a rabbit with the Chinchilla Dark Gene present

 

The image above shows a rabbit with the Chinchilla Dark Gene and the blue eyes present

 
 

The Sable Gene or The Chinchilla Light Gene:

This gene is different to the other genes at it has "incomplete dominance". This is due to when one has two sable genes (cchl x cchl), the result will not be sable but rather a color called seal. Seal is viewed as almost black. Like the cchd gene, this gene removes all yellow pigment from the hair shaft of the rabbit and a few dark pigments; this leaves the rabbit with a "shaded" look. Unlike the cchd gene, the cchl gene leave the eye color dark. 
altmark-bunnys.de.tl

The image above shows a rabbit with the Sable Gene 

 

http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/doublehrabbits/ndcolor.html

The image above shows a rabbit with the Sable Gene and an included Point pigmentation

 
 

The Himi Gene:

The Himi Gene (ch) shows rabbits, whose fur is a color called Pointed White. The rabbit is white except its muzzle, ears and feat. Furthermore, this gene is temperature sensitive and therefore the color would be darker and more distinctive in the colder temperatures. 

http://z15.invisionfree.com/ND_Network/ar/t1586.htm

The image above shows a rabbit with the Himi Gene

 

 
REW Gene:
 
The REW Gene causes the Rabbits body to not produce any pigments in the skin, fur, nails or/and eyes. Eyes with no pigment are not red but rather clear. This "ruby-eyed" appearance is actually the internal structure of the eye, which one can see due to the unpigmented iris of the eyeball. Rabbits which have the REW Gene are very seldom a true albino.
 
This gene can only be expressed in the Rabbit if it is present as a "cc" in the genotype and it is therefore a recessive Gene.

http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/doublehrabbits/ndcolor.html

The image above shows a rabbit with the REW Gene 

 
 

Colored and REW (in general) determined in the genotype:

CC - The rabbit has all color pigments in its appearance and it carries all pigments

Cc - All pigments are present in the appearance but the rabbit does not only carry all pigments, it also carries the REW gene

cc - The rabbits appearance is REW and it carries only the REW gene

 
 

Non-Dilute vs. Dilute- "D" The Color Dilution Gene

 

 

Non-Dilute:

The Rabbit shows a full strength in color.
Examples would be Black, Chocolate or Agouti.
 
The Non-Diluted Gene is dominant (D) and determined as a full strength in color.
 
http://die-isar-minizwerge.repage.de

The image above shows a non-diluted rabbit in the color black 

 
 
 
Diluted
 
The dilute will weaken the rabbits color, which may also effect the color of the rabbits eyes.
Examples would be Blue, Lilac or Lynx.
 
The Diluted Gene is recessive (d).

The image above shows a diluted rabbit in the color blue (black was diluted to blue). 

 

 

Diluted and Non-diluted color determined in the genotype:

DD - The rabbit has a non-diluted fur color and it carries only non-diluted colors

Dd - The rabbit has a non-diluted fur color, yet it carries both the non-dilute and dilute gene

dd - The rabbits appearance is dilute and it can only pass on the dilute gene to its offspring

 


Extension vs. Non-extension- "E" The Exension of Color Gene

 

 

Extension

When extension is present, the color lies throughout the hair-shaft.

Furthermore, there are four genes present in the extension set: E- full extension, ES- extension of dark color, e- extension of light color, and ej. The ES gene produces a variety of steel colors, and the ej gene produces harlequin color patterns. 

Examples of extension would be chocolate and chestnut. 

http://www.thenaturetrail.com/rabbit-genetics/agouti-tan-self-a-series-otter/

The image above shows a rabbit with the ES gene in the color of Agouti-Chestnut (a steel fur-color)

 

http://comfyposy.com/tag/harlequin-rabbits/

The image above shows a rabbit with the ej gene, which is present as a Harlequin pattern

 

 

Non-Extension

Non-Extension determinse the meaning of which the color does not fully extend throughout the hair-shaft.

Examples of non-extension would be fawn and tortoise. 

 

http://ferrebeekeeper.wordpress.com/tag/rabbit/

The image above shows a rabbit with the Non-extension gene, present within the fawn fur-color

 

 

Extension and Non-extension determined in the genotype:

EE - The rabbit has the extension gene dominating and can only pass this gene to its offspring

Ee - The rabbit has the extension gene dominating , yet it carries both the non-extension and extension gene

ee - The rabbits appearance is determined by the non-extension gene and it can only pass this gene to its offspring 

 

 

English Spotting- En Gene

The English Spotting Gene is still present in the "Gene E" group, yet it is made up of two different genes: En and en, En being the dominant gene.  

Enen will cause normal spotting (broken color Holland Lop), whereas EnEn will cause spottings primarilly on the head, resulting in a color named Charlie.

The last gene set of enen will result in a "normal"/solid colored rabbit.

Broken colors should not be bred together due to the instability of the genotype. But broken colors are able to be bred to solid colors, which would result in either one of the gene sets. 

http://www.rabbitsonline.net/f20/breeding-netherland-dwarf-bunnies-53660/index2.html

The image above shows a rabbit with the Charlie-Broken gene present (EnEn)

 

 

 

 
 
 

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